Posts Tagged ‘Writing’

Pen and Ink

There is something inherently intellectual about the smell of ink and the scratch of pen on paper. The ink glistening for a moment before drying, as if checking itself for errors before being set in stone. The glaring screen of a computer, no matter how modern, how convenient, can never reproduce the bold surety of your own handwriting, complete with interesting damages to the written character. A blurred letter is a surer sign of interest and excitement in your own work than a thousand spoken endorsements. The cramping hand lends itself to the construction of patience and perseverance. We lose the feeling in tired muscles, but not the aching need to keep going- keep writing before we explode from the sheer pressure of words wrapped up inside.

Advertisements

Three Reasons

There are only three reasons for including any string of words in your story: Setting, Plot, or Humor.

Setting gives the appearance of reality, even if it does not necessarily forward the story.

Plot is the most important part of any story. A plot driven story gains your reader’s attention, without drawing their minds away with miscellaneous details. The reader will learn to see that everything is related to the plot. It is more suspenseful for the reader to know of a certain thing that will affect the story, but not know how, rather than having no idea about what is coming.

Humor should be the least used. The occasional side note, decorated with a smile, can lighten the mood or prime the reader for tension.

Solace

Some men find solace in their work. They dig deep in a trench of paper and pencils. They set themselves tasks and goals and then pat themselves on the back when done.
Others lose themselves in song. Dance, music, compsoition. Twirling and striding and scraping a bow against wire.
Others seek the cold carress of sleep, or the fuzzy haze of alcohol or drugs. They seem to slip further and further down a sliding slope. Finally, they just end.
Some of us, however, find our muses in the written word. We read, and we think, and we write, and then we think some more.
We few are the lucky few.